Archive for the ‘photography’ tag

GETTING INSPIRED BY AMAZING FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY

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A list of websites that feature the hottest editorials ever published

We all pull inspiration from different sources. For some, it’s books and/or magazines that we go to for visual inspiration. For others, it could be going to a gallery and seeing art hanging on the walls, in person, in all its glory. And yet now, because of the internet, it seems we are finding our inspiration regularly from various websites. In my opinion, some of these sites aren’t so good. On the other hand, though, some sites really stand out!!

 

 

So where do I go when I want to look at some truly inspirational work? There are a few sites I signed up for their email updates because they consistently show great work by photographers who’s work I truly admire. Then there are other sites I just check in on every once in awhile when I find the time to surf the web, which truth be told, isn’t that often and getting less and less these days. However, I have to admit, it’s good for me to keep up to date on who’s being published and where. There’s a lot of amazing websites out there but for this list I want to highlight the sites that showcase awesome and beautiful editorials. Not every site on this list features an editorial all the time, but for the most part, they do. And it’s these sites that draw me back repeatedly because of their discerning taste.

 

Take note: while I think it’s perfectly fine to be inspired with other people’s work, take care to use their work as inspiration and not to copy. Use your own unique way of seeing to execute your own vision. That’s key to developing your eye. And stream lining your style

 

AND: (no, I’m not done yet) I have this to add as well. I think a lot of young people (young photographers) do this thing I call “compare and despair”. It’s where you go out and shoot what you feel is a fairly good shoot and then race home, jump on the computer and start comparing yourself to photographers who have been shooting for 20, 30, maybe even 40 years more than you have. You then cancel out any good feelings you might have for your own work. Try to look at the following sites for visual aids to help inspire you, not make you feel thwarted, thereby squelching your own natural learning curve.

 

Lastly, I’d love to know if you have any sites that you guys frequent. It’s always good to hear about what you find inspiring. I’m sure the other readers would love to read about them as well.

 

The List:

 

  1. Haute Macabre http://hautemacabre.com/
    One of my favorites sites to visit. I’m subscribed to them and I check every email. I might not click through every one but they are at the top of my list because they regularly feature two of my favorite photographers, Javier Valhonrat and Paolo Roversi. Plus, they’re theme leans towards beautiful gothic looks. Which is a big part of my own style, I think. And….well…..they’ve featured me on their site. That’s always a plus.
  2. Cali Kartel http://calikartel.com/
    Cali Kartel has consistently great editorials. I haven’t been featured on there, which unnerved me at first since I once LIVED in Cali and I’m FROM Cali. Still, not one to hold a grudge, this site rocks!
  3. Ben Trovato http://bentrovatoblog.com/
    A site dedicated to showcasing exclusive fashion editorials by up-and-coming photographers.
  4. Fashion Gone Rogue http://fashiongonerogue.com/
    Up to date, current, still on the newsstands fashion editorials delivered right to your monitor! Fabulous site.
  5. The Fashionisto http://thefashionisto.com/
    All men’s editorial features. And since I shoot men and love shooting men, I like to see what’s being published out there.
  6. The Contributing Editor http://thecontributingeditor.com/
    I fell in love with The Contributing Editor awhile ago. They always feature gorgeous men’s editorials.
  7. Homotography http://homotography.blogspot.com/
    The hottest of the men’s editorials.
  8. The Ones 2 Watch http://theones2watch.com/
    Because you should be watching the ones to watch. ; )
  9. The Photography Link http://thephotographylink.com/
    Their motto says it all: “Because Images are Everything”. I agree.
  10. Fashion Editorials http://fashioneditorials.com/
    This aptly named site has exactly what their url promises: Fashion Editorials. While they sort of run the same editorials that Fashion Gone Rogue does, sometimes you’ll find some random spreads that are worth taking a look at.
  11. The House of Editorial http://houseofeditorial.com/
    I love this site because they run the editorials that everybody else isn’t running, which is important. The work they feature is just as gorgeous and just as compelling as the “bigger magazine” spreads.
  12. Noir Façade http://noirfacade.livejournal.com/
    This is a livejournal site and it’s well thought out. I love most of the stories they feature.
  13. Paper Mode http://papermode.trendland.net/
    Great resource for looking up older editorials that are outstanding in every way!

 

 

 

 

Written by Christopher Kilkus

April 26th, 2017 at 7:04 am

Getting it all together christopher kilkus photography

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I’m a bit embarassed to admit that I have never really done any promotion to speak of.  I think the last time I did a promo mailer was about three years ago, just simple postcard.  And worse, I haven’t even really had a printed portfolio for the last year and a half!  I’ve been extremely fortunate to grow my business based on word of mouth, and the work I was doing and uploading to my website.  I wouldn’t ever recommend this as a way to do business to any new photographer…. but sometimes it can be hard to implement the things you know into your own business practices.  Over the last two, maybe even three years I’ve been so busy I haven’t had what I felt was enough time to really do promotion right, and whats more, I don’t think I could have even taken on anymore jobs even if the promotion worked!  The about our business is that the busier you are, the less time you have to devote to getting new clients.  Well, this month has been the first that I’ve had time to slow down a bit and really look at doing promotion.

I have also just signed up with a new agent, and she is very strict with her photographers about doing promotion.

First thing I needed, was to at least get some temporary materials in place to tide me over until I could do everything right.  That meant a portfolio and a leave behind promo.  I chose a blurb book because it was quick and easy.  I used to use standard portfolios from House of Portfolios with acetate pages, then print out my images on an Epson printer.  I never liked the quality of this presentation.  I using matte paper but the process was just so slow and expensive.  And in fashion, more than most other types of photography, the portfolio is constantly changing and it’s really hard to keep 8 portfolios updated.  With blurb I just uploaded a pdf of the new layout and ordered the updated book.

Written by Christopher Kilkus

February 11th, 2016 at 2:58 pm

Equipment by chris kilkus

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I am frequently asked what lgihting, grip and camera equipment I use, so I thought I would share about this.  You might be surprised to learn what my preferences are!

I am very far from being an equipment geek.  If something is inexpensive but does a good job, I’ll use that over an item that has a name.

 

FROM B&H

As a working photographer, the center of the universe is your camera bag and its contents. Your cameras and lenses are the tools of your trade. As you may have noted, both are mentioned in plural because just as you wouldn’t jump out of an airplane without a backup parachute, you shouldn’t attempt to photograph an emotionally spiked, non-repeatable event armed with only one camera. The same applies to lenses, too. The many aspects that comprise shooting weddings—portraits, the ceremony, dimly lit environs, tight, crowded quarters and bright outdoor settings—can push both the creative and practical limitations of the most experienced photographers.

Cameras and lenses aside (see our separate sections on Cameras and Lenses) there are a number of other items that should be part of all wedding photographers’ war chests. Having these items on hand and knowing how to use them can make the difference between a great wedding album and one that’s mundane.

Tripods

It is essential to have a sturdy tripod at your disposal when you are photographing a wedding, for situations in low light, or when you have to compose formal group shots. If you place a remote-triggered camera in the chapel balcony, you’ll need to mount it on a tripod, or perhaps use a Super clamp or similarly adjustable clamp, with 1/4″-20 or 3/8″-16 camera threads. It’s a great idea to have a small tabletop tripod with you as well, which can help you steady a shot atop a table or other horizontal surface. One of these can also help when you need to brace the camera vertically against a wall or other architectural element to obtain images free of the blur associated with operator movement.

For more information about choosing a tripod, please refer to our Tripod and Tripod Heads Buying Guide.

Flash Meters

For ambient light readings, the meter in your camera can be quite sufficient. Flash metering is another story, especially if you are using flash to fill backlit subjects or darken background areas to place more emphasis on the subjects in the foreground. You can always shoot test exposures and review them on your camera’s LCD, but a more professional and certainly more precise method of establishing accurate flash exposures is by using a flash meter.

One consistent characteristic of flash meters is that even the least expensive of them can establish both ambient and flash exposures—reflective or incident—down to 1/10-stop in accuracy, wirelessly or tethered. When you are dealing with the broad contrast range presented by men’s and women’s wedding clothes, it is important to consider the benefits of taking incident readings with a handheld light meter. Incident readings measure the amount of light falling on the subject, rather than the amount of light reflected from the subject. In most cases, incident readings, which read the light in terms of neutral, 18% gray values, will provide you with accurate average exposures regardless of whether your subjects are wearing white gowns, black tuxedos or brightly colored bridesmaid dresses.

Sekonic goes one step further by offering the option of incorporating PocketWizard wireless triggers into many of their flash meters, which enables you to “walk the set” in order to establish flash and ambient exposure readings from any position within the frame. At B&H, we stock a variety of flash meters from companies including Sekonic, Gossen, Shepherd/Polaris, Interfit, Wein and Kenko.

Wireless Remote Triggers

When it comes to taking pictures in crowded environments, the fewer cables you have strewn about the floor, the better. Every cable you can eliminate is one less worry about a guest tripping and falling. Wireless remotes can be used to trigger your main and fill flashes and your cameras. Many wireless remotes feature multiple channels or frequencies, which is a valuable feature if you’re shooting in close proximity to other photographers using wireless triggers or when you need to trigger different groups of your own lights.  By coordinating channel selections, everybody can perform their duties without interfering with the other photographers’ agenda.

For shooting in “photographer-rich” environments such as catering halls hosting simultaneous weddings, each with its own photographer—or such as when you and your assistant are capturing alternate views of the same wedding with two cameras—the PocketWizard MultiMax offers a choice of 32 channels, while the Pearstone Wireless Shutterboss Remote Timer offers 99 channels. You can also use the multiple-channel feature to trigger multiple sets of electronic flash units independently from each other, which is particularly handy when those setups are being used simultaneously. Available individually or in sets, radio transmitters, receivers and transceivers are available from PocketWizardQuantum and Elinchrom. Keep in mind that a remote trigger can become almost as useful as an assistant when used to trigger a tripod-mounted remote camera with a wide-angle lens in the church balcony, for example, capturing the  aerial views of the ceremony.

In addition to the radio-slave offering from Elinchrom, Quantum and Pocket Wizard, we also stock the Impact PowerSync 16 DC Radio Slave System, a very affordable battery-powered (AC optional) wireless trigger system that offers a choice of 16 channels and a range of up to 590′ (180 m) indoors and up to 200′ (60 m) outdoors.

Dedicated and generic wireless camera triggers are also available from Hahnel and Dot Line, and many of these remotes are also available in multi-channel models. Dedicated wired and wireless remote controls are also available from Nikon and Canon.

Battery Grips

Battery grips are advantageous for several reasons, but are primarily valuable because they sport secondary shutter release buttons and command dials, which make it ergonomically easier to orient your camera vertically. Battery grips also add an extra measure of grip-ability, which is an especially welcome feature for ensuring a positive hold on your camera. Because battery grips hold dual batteries, you can expect to make twice as many exposures before having to replace your camera’s batteries. Depending on the make and model, many battery grips also offer the option of powering with standard AA batteries, which can prove to be a lifesaver when the party is still raging on and all your rechargeable batteries are spent. Vello offers a range of battery grips to suit a number of popular DSLRs, such as the Canon 5D Mark II and 7D, as well as Nikon’s D7000 and D5100.

Filters

Even though the White Balance controls are built into every digital camera, not to mention the fact that the post capture color-correction tools found in almost every photo editing program have reduced the need for color compensating (CC) filters, there are some filters that simply cannot be dialed in from the comfort of your camera’s menu selections. Included among these filters are PolarizingUV (ultraviolet reduction), Neutral Density (solidgraduated, or center ND) and diffusion filters.

Polarizing filters, which in terms of wedding photography are primarily used for outdoor scenes, are designed to eliminate glare, reflections in polished surfaces, glass and water and make clouds pop from darkened blue skies. They are great to use if your wedding party is posed beside a body of water or a glass-walled urban structrue. To eliminate stray light from striking your lens, always use a lens hood. Do take care when using a polarizing filter on a wide-angle lens; the amount of polarizing effect is directly influenced by the lens’s angle to the sun, and this combination of lens and filter can cause your sky to vary unnaturally from light to almost navy blue.

UV filters serve their purpose both indoors and out. Indoors, UV filters temper the degree of UV radiation that might be generated by your electronic flash tubes. Though invisible to the human eye, UV can leave a bluish cast in your images under certain types of lighting. Regardless of whether you are shooting indoors or out, using UV filters is an effective way to protect the front element of your lens. Another option for protecting the front elements of your lenses is to use clear protection filters such as the Hoya Clear Pro 1 Digital Multi-coated filters and Nikon’s NC Glass filters. There are a number of electronic filters on the market that allow you to layer filter effects to your photographs, post capture, and many of them work quite well. The exception are software-generated Polarizing filters, which only serve to saturate color, but cannot remove reflections and glare, which can only be achieved at the time of capture.

Neutral density (ND) filters are essentially neutrally tinted filters that enable you to reduce the amount of light entering your lens so you can alter your shutter or aperture settings in the same light. ND filters come in handy when you need to reduce the output of your lighting system beyond its existing low-power setting. ND filters are also an easy solution for shooting at wider apertures in bright light in order to take advantage of selective-focus effects.

ND filters can be handy for adding suggestions of movement in an otherwise static photograph. As an example, with a 3- or 4-stop ND filter in place, you can pose the newlyweds in front of a waterfall and turn the waterfall into a creamy blur by slowing your shutter speed, while the couple holds stock still and remains tack sharp. This technique can be used with any moving background or foreground, with striking results. This is also a handy way to eliminate otherwise distracting moving elements in a picture.

In addition to standard ND filters, Variable ND filters are also available, which allow you to change the degree of neutral density by 2-8 stops, simply by rotating the outer ring of the filter. This can be a huge time saver while shooting under the gun.

Diffusion filters should be part of every portrait and wedding photographer’s outfit. Designed to soften the skin tones and create a dreamy haze, diffusion filters are available in numerous degrees of textures and patterns, which can flatter the complexions of people who don’t resemble the high-fashion models we’re used to seeing on magazine covers. If you want to soften facial features, smooth lines and wrinkles without the dreamy haze-like effect, try a soft-focus filter. These are especially flattering for portraits. When using diffusion and soft-focus filters, it’s always a good idea to go easy on the amount of softening you employ, as too much diffusion can be as distracting as none at all. So be judicious. Tread softly.

Tiffen FX-series diffusion filters are available in a number of configurations including “black diffusion” filters, which soften the image without reducing the overall contrast levels of the photograph. Many Tiffen FX-series filters are also available in a choice of warm-tone and neutral tone.

Filters are available in a range of quality levels, and with the possible exception of diffusion filters, you should always use higher-quality filters on your lenses in order to maintain the sharpness levels of the lenses you paid hard-earned money for the pleasure of owning and using.

Batteries

When it comes to photography—especially digital photography—batteries make the world go round, and when you run out of juice, your world basically comes to a halt. This is not a good thing when you’re out on a job, wedding or otherwise. For this reason it’s obligatory that you have, at the very least, a complete set of back-up batteries for every item in your bag that uses batteries.

Although most cameras are powered by dedicated lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, accessories such as flashguns, transceivers, etc., still rely on AA, AAA, 9V, C, D and any number of button-type batteries. At the very least, you should always carry a minimum of one spare set of batteries for each of your battery-powered devices.

At B&H we stock an extensive assortment of dedicated rechargeable camera batteries for most popular cameras and dedicated flashguns. If your batteries are rechargeable, make sure the chargers are also packed and readily accessible. An appealing option for efficient charging is Pearstone’s Duo Battery Charger, which allows you to charge two batteries at a time and mix and match types or brands of batteries.

Easy access to AC power outlets is another big concern, and to ensure you’re never caught short, it’s highly recommended that you carry at least one AC extension power cord for each AC-powered device you will be using during the course of the day. Though available in a number of colors and lengths, it makes the most sense to stick to 25′ or 50′ lengths, many of which are available with triple outlets that enable you to tap up to three packs or devices into each cord.

Depending on your gear and the state of the electrical system you will be working with, it’s not a bad idea to include a few surge protectors, which are available in a number of configurations, as well as a few multi-voltage adapters/converters if your plans include shooting across international borders.

Gaffer Tape

Sometimes a simple strip of gaffer tape can make the difference between a minor hiccup and a total disaster. Available in a number of widths (3″, 2″, 1″ and ½”) and colors (black, white, gray, red, yellow, blue, fluorescent green, fluorescent orange, fluorescent pink, fluorescent yellow), gaffer tape can be used for taping cables securely along the floor, quick repairs of gear, securing cases for shipping and any number of other uses. Gaffer tape in colors can also be used to identify your gear quickly in terms of where it goes when packing up, or in the case of shooting with multi-channel lighting systems, color-coding individual channels and related gear for syncing purposes. Gaffer tape is a thinking photographer’s solution.

As we mentioned in the section above on wireless triggers, even though we live in an increasingly wireless universe, we still have to deal with cables. To ensure that nobody trips over them, we suggest that in addition to gaffer tape, you include a few rolls of Permacel/Shurtape Cable Path Gaffer Tape in your kit. Available in 4″ and 6″ widths (x 30 yards), this extra-wide yellow gaffer tape features a glue-free center channel that allows you to secure long runs of lighting and sound cables to the floor, without the hassle of wrestling the tape from the cables when you’re finished for the day.

A reusable alternative to taping cables to carpeted surfaces is the Safcord Cord & Cable Protector, which is available in a choice of 3″ x 6′ and 4″ x 30′. Made of industrial-grade Cordura Nylon, Safcord Cord & Cable Protectors use hook-and-loop touch fastener material instead of adhesive to securely hold cords and cables to carpeted surfaces. When you’re finished, all you have to do is pull the strips from the floor, roll them up and tuck them away until your next gig.

Memory Cards

You can never have enough of them, and the faster the read/write speed, the better. Hi-speed memory cards keep shrinking in price while growing in capacity. If the read/write speeds of the newest cards are faster than the read/write speed of your current camera, this only means it will be an ideal match for your next camera, which will undoubtedly outstrip the camera you currently own in terms of processing speed. The same school of thought goes for the storage capacities of your memory cards. Today’s cameras capture larger file sizes—and sometimes multiple files simultaneously—not to mention video, which eats up memory like there’s no tomorrow. So when contemplating your next card, remember it wasn’t all that long ago a 1GB card was a big deal. Make sure to use cards with as much memory as is compatible with your camera. If you are going to capture large RAW files and “process” them in some sort of post-production software such as Photoshop or Lightroom, it might be wise to research cameras that sport dual card slots and the ability to write to both cards, for backup.

With the exception of portraits, capturing rapid action photo sequences without missing a beat requires using cards that can process large image files as fast—or faster—than your camera can capture them. Some of the fastest CF cards we currently stock at B&H include SanDisk’s Extreme Pro-series CF memory cards and Lexar’s 400x and 600x Professional-series CompactFlash cards. For cameras using SD series memory cards, the fastest of the lot currently include Lexar’s Professional SDHC/XC memory cards and SanDisk’s Extreme Pro SDHC and SDXC memory cards.

JPEGs are fine for snapshots, but if you are going to present a finished portfolio of images with as much color, dynamic range and detail as possible, you’ll want to shoot and process RAW files, which take up a great deal more space and beg for larger-capacity memory cards. JPEGs, which don’t contain as much visual information, take up less space but leave off where RAW files begin, quality-wise.

Storage Devices

With the speed and storage capacities of memory cards steadily increasing, incessant card-swapping and data backup may not be as critical as it was not too long ago. It’s comforting to know your back is covered if anything should happen to your cards during or after the ceremony and reception. Once you fill your memory cards, you have to do something with the image files each one contains before you reformat a card and pop it back into your camera. For storing these image files you have several viable options, some of which require the use of a laptop, netbook or tablet containing a built-in card reader that’s compatible with the card format you are using (i.e. SD, CF, Memory Stick, etc.). You can also use a USB or FireWire port for attaching a storage drive or a receiver. You can even transmit image files to your drive or laptop wirelessly.

If you’d rather bypass a laptop, netbook, or tablet, there are also stock portable hard drives available with built-in card readers and LCD screens for reviewing your pictures, from companies including WolverineDigital Foci and Jobo.

USB and FireWire-enabled portable storage drives, which currently sell for as little as (or under) $100 for 1 terabyte of storage space, are quick and easy solutions for backing up or archiving images. Your files can also be stored temporarily on your laptop, netbook or tablet’s hard drive.

One company that’s been gaining attention in the world of on-the-fly data storage is Nexto DI, which manufactures a nice selection of high-performance portable storage drives in capacities of up to 750GB, many of which contain LCD screens for reviewing and editing image files downloaded from your memory cards. Depending on the model, Nexto DI storage devices are shock and drop resistant, can transfer data to other devices and burn data to Blu-ray Discs, recover bad sectors and support a number of memory-card formats including Panasonic P2/P2E cards, UDF and FAT32 memory cards.

If you think you are going to be really piling up the megabytes as you photograph the wedding, and your cameras of choice include certain Canon DSLRs, you also have the option of using Canon Wireless File Transfer transmitters, which enable you to upload image files to a notebook computer for backup and extra storage space, as you shoot. And if you’re shooting with another brand of camera, don’t forget about Eye-Fi cards, which can transmit your photos to your external hard drive or laptop wirelessly, allowing you to maintain open space on the card. Another option favored by wedding photographers is to upload captured image files to any number of cloud-based servers, which can be edited and made accessible to the clients for their enjoyment even before the festivities have ended.

Posing Stools

Posing stools are worth considering because they are less obtrusive and easier to use for posing purposes than the chairs you’re likely to find at the catering hall or the local VFW. Narrow in profile, swivel-based and adjustable in height, posing stools allow you to pose individuals and couples with a great degree of fluidity and flexibility. Most of these posing stools can be broken down for easy transport. Posing stools are available from ImpactPhotogenicNorman and  Delta 1.

Camera Lens/Sensor Cleaning Kits

The truly important guidelines of proper camera user maintenance involve keeping your camera’s lenses, imaging sensor and LCD smudge free, all of which involves checking your gear before, during and after every assignment. Happily, B&H is your source for both cleaning cloths and LCD screen protectors.

Maintaining smudge-free lenses—specifically the front and rear elements—is a relatively effortless affair. To remove incidental dust particles, a camel-hair brush is often sufficient, and assuming the brush is clean, camel-hair brushes don’t leave any residue behind. You can also use an air blower to remove dust particles and grit. Most lens smudges can be easily eliminated by simply breathing on the lens surface and wiping it clean with a microfiber cloth. Repeat the breathe-and-wipe process once or twice if needed, or if the smudges are more tenacious, go the heavier-duty route with a lens-cleaning kit. For more stubborn smudges, a good lens-cleaning kit can be a lifesaver. Apply the lens-cleaning solution to your cloth, not directly to the lens, and wipe in gentle, circular motions—never apply lens-cleaning solution directly to the lens surface. A few drops applied sparingly to a microfiber cloth should be more than sufficient to remove almost anything. Cleaning kits like these are indispensible for ensuring clean lenses and crisp image capture and are available from a number of manufacturers.

For cleaning smudges from the harder-to-reach edges of the lens elements, try applying a few drops of lens-safe cleaning solution to a cotton swab and gently swipe the dirt from its hiding place. Many kits also contain baster-like air blowers, which are also handy for clearing dust off your camera sensor. Never use canned compressed air to clean your sensor!

Even if your camera has a built-in dust-reduction system, inevitably a bit of dust or two will find its way onto your camera’s mirror or imaging sensor. If you see fuzzy dark spots when you peer through your camera’s viewfinder, the villains are on the mirror. These particles can usually be blown away easily by removing the lens and, with the camera pointed face-down, blowing the dust off the mirror’s surface with a few blasts from one of the baster-like air blowers we sell at B&H. Follow up by cleaning the particulate matter from your camera sensor—carefully—with any one of a number of comprehensive sensor-cleaning kits.

If you are going to use sensor-cleaning kits, it is imperative that you read the instructions thoroughly and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations in order to avoid damaging the camera’s imaging sensor. It’s a good idea to clean your gear after every event, followed by a quick check before the next job, because you have better things to do the day of the event. And don’t forget to hold your camera with the sensor pointing at the floor when you’re changing lenses. Dust tends to descend more often than it ascends. You should avoid touching the mirror surface with your fingers, cotton swabs, or anything else at all costs, because unlike the mirrors in which we admire ourselves when nobody’s looking, the mirrors in our cameras are surface-coated and as such can be easily scratched and otherwise permanently damaged. Keep fingers away from the camera sensor, too, which is sensitive to abrasion as well as the grease and oils on your skin.

Often overlooked, but important nonetheless, is cleaning the contacts of your memory cards. Grit and work-a-day greasy stuff can render your memory cards undependable, and when you’re shooting a one-time happening, you don’t want your cards to hang up on you. In order to minimize the chance of compromised data transmission between your camera and memory card, it’s a good idea to clean the card contacts regularly with a memory card cleaning kit, such as the Kinetronics Memory Card Contact Cleaning Kit.

Ladders and Stepladders

One of the tricks of grabbing successful photographs at crowded events such as weddings is to rise above the occasion, which is easily accomplished by climbing a few steps up a ladder or stepstool. B&H stocks a number of ladders, both single-sided and double-sided, in 4′, 6′, 8′, 10′ and 12′ heights that enable you to catch imagery you probably couldn’t get standing flat-footed on the floor.

Folding Reflectors

Folding reflectors for bounce lighting, which allow you to fill shadows and perform a variety of lighting effects using ambient or studio light, are invaluable indoors and out.  Available in a number of shapes and sizes (circular reflectors 12″ to 60″ and curved, rectangular reflectors measuring 24 x 36″, 36 x 48″, 41 x 74″,  42 x 72″ and 48 x 72″), folding reflectors are configured in a combination of gold/silver,  gold/white,  silver/white or gold/silver/white. Depending on the tone of the reflector, you can open up shadow details with soft-neutral, contrasty-neutral or warm-toned illumination.

For softening harsher, overhead midday light, try using a translucent diffuser panel (also available in circular and rectangular formats) between the sun and your subjects. Because folding reflectors and diffusers are extremely light and fold down to about a quarter of their full size, they’re easy to pack and transport. Don’t leave home without one… or two!

Reflectors and diffusers can be invaluable lighting tools on the big day, but there’s not always a spare set of hands available to hold them in place. An effective substitute for an assistant is a reflector holder. Available with and without an accompanying light stand, reflector holders are available in a number of designs from close to a dozen manufacturers. Two popular (and quite affordable) models are the Impact Telescopic Collapsible Reflector Holder (holder arm only) and the Impact Multiboom Light Stand/Reflector Holder, which includes a 13′ stand.

Flashlights

Small, pocket-sized flashlights are essential for retrieving small accessories that inevitably find their way into hard-to-find creases in the corners of your camera bag. This is especially true in the bottom of a black bag when the lights are low, which at many weddings, is par for the course. Make sure everyone assisting you has a flashlight tucked away in easy reach. LED flashlights are extremely bright for their size, and drain batteries much more slowly than incandescent lights do.

Leatherman Tool

Stuff happens, and when it does it’s nice to have a tool handy that can help rectify the problem. Because it’s not practical to haul around a wheeled, four-drawer Craftsman tool chest, many on-site glitches can often be remedied with the aid of a Leatherman multitool. Available in a number of configurations, your investment will have paid for itself the first time you need it… and as any seasoned pro can tell you, sooner than later, you’re going to need one.

Two-Way Radios

When it comes to weddings it’s not unusual for two or more important photo ops to occur simultaneously, and often with little or no warning, which makes communicating with assistants extremely important. To make certain that one-time photo ops aren’t missed, it’s a good idea for everyone on the photo team to be issued a two-way radio in order to keep communication flowing, which at wedding speeds is a top priority.

Essential and Incidental

To complete your gear checklist and possibly even save the day, make sure you always pack other items in your bags, such as a sewing kit, a first-aid kit, a notepad and pen, safety pins, straight pins and bobby pins, snacks, water, umbrellas, even hairspray—should a windy day threaten a bride’s hairdo.

What are some of the essential items you pack in your kit? Feel free to let us know in the Comments section below.

Written by Christopher Kilkus

February 11th, 2016 at 2:56 pm

Chris Kilkus Photography – Meet Kilkus the punk band

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Check out the punk band that randomly chose Kilkus as their name:

Music Video – Pattern of Self Design

Music Video – A.O.C.

Interview with Waffle Magazine

It’s not fashion photography but music is always a close neighbor 🙂

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Fashion photography rules everything around us, whether we know it, like it, or choose to embrace it. At its start in 1839, it existed strictly to sell. .

Legends like Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdin, Helmut Newton, and Irving Penn paved the way for the greats of today, challenging the fashion world to accept new ideas of sexiness, femininity, and masculinity. It’s no secret that in the 21st century, photographers are as plentiful as they are powerful. Photographers like Steven Meisel and Terry Richardson have launched the careers of models, stylists, and make-up artists.

Others like Rankin and Nick Knight have created media platforms to take fashion photography and film in unanticipated yet important directions.

All of the fashion photographers on this list share an appetite for excellence and continually succeed at redefining visual culture, beauty, and art. We are thankful for them.

The 50 Greatest Fashion Photographers Right Now comprised of the subject(s), location, styling, make-up, hair, and photographer’s vision.

Legends like Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdin, Helmut Newton, and Irving Penn paved the way for the greats of today, challenging the fashion world to accept new ideas of sexiness, femininity, and masculinity. Most of the photographers on this list admit to or demonstra

Written by Christopher Kilkus

February 11th, 2016 at 2:23 pm

The Cult of Style Blog Post about Chris Kilkus Photography

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Thank you to the folks at the Cult of Style blog for publishing a shoot a did a little while back in a sunny and warm Los Angeles.  This was a test shoot I did with the fashion stylist Kate Riney and hair & make up artist Maria Nguyen.  Our model for the day was Noora Laapi.  I wanted to keep this a pretty loose shoot… just go out and have fun, look for nice spots and nice light and take some simple photos.  I added a the color effect in post to also give it a slightly retro california vibe.

chris kilkus photography photographer

chris christopher kilkus photographer photography

chris christopher kilkus photographer photography

chris christopher kilkus photographer photography

chris christopher kilkus photographer photography

chris christopher kilkus photographer photography

chris christopher kilkus photographer photography

Written by Christopher Kilkus

January 14th, 2013 at 3:24 pm

Use Chris Kilkus Photographs as Wrapping Paper!

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I was surfing through some fashion blogs and stumbled on this posting from Fashion Blog Mexico.  They show how to use pages from a magazine for wrapping paper, and happen to be using a magazine I shot for Forever 21 in their example.  Too funny!  I don’t know if I should be flattered or insulted!  Haha!

(Translation courtesy of Google)

DIY Gift Wrapping with fashion magazine

You probably have around your house several old magazines that do not re-read but not get rid of them “just deal”, well I do that, but I recently saw the need to wrap a birthday present and thought recycle fashion magazine to wrap, to be different and a bit more friendly to the planet earth. This idea is fabulous now come the holidays, is a good way to be creative, save some money and recycle old magazines.

 

For this DIY you need:

– Fashion Magazine
– Safe (I used one of Boa Accessories, truly a gift wrapped)
– Scissors
– Tape
– Ribbon for decoration gift

Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

Step by step
1. Flip through the magazine and select two or three pages and you want to use as many great your gift. I chose a two-page editorial. Arráncalas and cut the edge to become straight.
Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

2. Une pages you cut with tape, what you see in the image is what is on the inside of the gift, you can paste more pages up or sideways as you need, the idea is to build a “statement” to put wrapping paper the box.
Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

3. Now wrap the box as if it were any typical gift paper.
Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

4. Once wrapped the box you can decorate it with ribbons, you can do it with a thick cloth ribbon and make a big bow top, or decorate with ribbon wrapping paper and put a cut some figure in the center.
Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

Yo recorté una flor de una de las páginas de la revista y la use como centro para los listones. No te preocupes si el corte no es perfecto, esos detalles son parte del encanto.
Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

Ready! No one will have a gift wrapped like yours. This DIY was inspired by my sister, who is a freak of the environment and forces me to recycle, I thought it was more about a gift of recycled wrapping paper and elegant chignon, and apparently I managed.

Foto de DIY Envoltura de regalo con revista de moda

 

 

Written by Christopher Kilkus

January 4th, 2013 at 7:19 am

Cool Video- chris christopher kilkus fashion photography photographer

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Matta – Release The Freq from Kim Holm on Vimeo.

 

Matta

Otherwise known as Andy Brookes & James Wilson, Matta joined forces in 2009 after meeting at Music College. Specialising in dance-floor orientated Bass Music, Matta have shaken up Parties and Festivals all over the world including prestigious Secret Garden Party and Maschinenfest, released on labels including Ad Noiseam, Black Butter, Boka, and Subway Records, are being supported by huge names such as Bjork, The Prodigy, Bastille & Laurent Garnier. They’ve had their music featured on TV ad campaigns for Audi and Childline and have already accumulated well over 2 Million YouTube & Vimeo views collectively, mainly for one particular hit release, ‘Release The Freq‘.

They’ve also had some pretty surreal experiences during shows too. “We were in the middle of our set at a gig in Kiev, Ukraine when a huge group of men  were speaking in Russian so we couldn’t understand…” “We sat there for 2 hours with our hands on the table wondering what was going on!”

This light-hearted and down to earth duo take their music very seriously, their personalities and dedication shine through all of their work, and as they’re not shy of give.

THE 15 MOST STYLISH MUSIC VIDEOS OF 2011

Music—especially the men and women who make it—has served as inspiration in the fashion world for decades, and this year we felt it more than ever. Everywhere we turned, musical muses were popping up in the front rows of runway shows (in some cases, even on the runway), as well as on magazine covers month after month. The fascination fashion has with music must go both ways, because artists have recently stepped up their style game in their music videos as well, wearing pieces from the world’s most prestigious fashion houses and custom couture creations that would make even the most snobbish of editors drool. The 2011 crop of music videos featured everything from ’90s supermodels to rampant fashion photography references, and we’ve picked the 15 videos that we believe really stood out in the style department. Which one did you watch on repeat? Richardson has directed music videos since the late 1990s.[10] He directed videos for Death in Vegas and Primal Scream as well as alternate music video of the song “Find a New Way” by the band Young Love and Whirlwind Heat‘s “Purple” featuring models Susan Eldridge and Kemp Muhl.[10][37] He directed the music video for “Red Lips” by Sky Ferreira.[38] He also makes a cameo appearance in Thirty Seconds to Mars‘s video for “Hurricane“.[39] On August 29, 2013 he directed Beyoncé in a music video at Coney Island for her single “XO“. He also directed “Wrecking Ball” by Miley Cyrus.[40] In late 2013 Richardson did the treatment on the music video for “Do What U Want” by Lady Gaga and R. Kelly from her third studio album titled ARTPOP, the film has yet to be released.

Written by Christopher Kilkus

July 10th, 2012 at 6:44 am